High UK Visa Rejection Rate

Harsher Visas stump students

Britain yet again tightens it’s grip around immigration, international students recoil.
As of November, Great Britain will harden the shell of it’s countries further, shaving the education of many valued international immigrants who make up a large percentage of the schooling system’s economical worth.

Decisions within the government have ruled that places of higher education such as universities and colleges who sponsor non European Union international students will have to strengthen their choices of risk losing an important title.

The Highly Trusted Sponsor is a title which allows schools to offer scholarships to international students of potential. At this moment, an institution may don the title if the rate of Visa rejection is 20% or less.

Main Reasons for High UK Visa Rejection Rate

Visa rejection may be due to many reasons, ranging from suspicious activity to lack of documents to a weak story as to why they are applying.
From November, the percentage of rejection must be no more than 10%. UK higher education exports were worth £10 billion as of 2011-12.
We can expect to see that figure drop dramatically as students around the world slowly seem to be changing their minds about scholarship within Britain.
London alone has over 100,000 international students living within it’s quarters.

This comes in a time of great change for Britain, where a determined government aims to change the way the borders of the country work completely.

High UK Visa Rejection RateTeresa may commented that the government will:
“Make British a less attractive place for those who come here for the wrong reasons.”
However, an inefficient system has of late, began to show how deeply the cracks lie within the fractured system of deciding who to keep and who to reject.
The international (non EU) tuition contribution is worth upwards of £3 billion, which is roughly 30% of tuition in total.
Being such a large percentage of what is a sector which is regularly criticised for being underpaid due to budget cuts, many have expressed concern as to whether parliament considered the true implications of this situation as fully as it could have when it began the process.

Is Britain becoming a place that is harsher to immigrants?
Or is this just par for the course as we reform our country?

There is stacking evidence that suggests that international individuals and families that would have first considered immigrating have now been staved off for many reasons which have recently emerged from both the populace and parliament. Accusations of bias, harshness and a changing way of running the country have been flowing through social networking.
However, we must remember, there are always issues when something as huge as a country attempts to reform a whole sector of the way it is run, backlash is inevitable. Look back into history and there has always been controversy toward acts such as this.
Is this different?

In a changing world, the government is attempting to answer to demands by voters. Are these actions too harsh?
We are certainly damaging both our economy, and social diversity. Only time will show the true repercussions of what seems currently to have been a self destructive move.